Multiple stressors in coastal wetlands: shifting our focus to real world scenarios

  • Posted by Marina Richardson
  • On January 20, 2021
By Andria Ostrowski   Vegetated coastal wetlands including saltmarshes, mangrove forests and seagrass meadows store large amounts of carbon, protect shorelines from storms and erosion, support enormous biodiversity and improve water quality by filtering nutrients, contaminants and sediments.   Despite their ecological and economic importance, increasing human settlement and development along coastlines introduce stressors that […]
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Global Trends in Mangrove Forest Fragmentation

  • Posted by Marina Richardson
  • On December 21, 2020
Dale Bryan-Brown finished his PhD this year under the supervision of GLOW Director Professor Rod Connolly and Research Leader Dr. Chris Brown investigating global trends in mangrove forest fragmentation. His research paper was a finalist for the best student paper award in the 2020 Australian Rivers Institute Awards at Griffith University. Watch his presentation below […]
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New funding to support a synthesis of mangrove threats, governance, and conservation outcomes.

  • Posted by Marina Richardson
  • On December 11, 2020
By Dr Mischa Turschwell & Dr Dominic Andradi-Brown Mangrove forests are critical ecosystems that support threatened species and provide vital ecosystem services including the provision of habitat for fishes and other marine species, protecting shorelines from erosion and the storage and sequestration of carbon, a process critical in the fight against climate change. Despite the […]
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Deep learning for ecological monitoring: performance in novel habitats and benefits of varied training data

  • Posted by Ellen Ditria
  • On October 26, 2020
By Ellen Ditria, PhD candidate Deep learning has fast become recognised as a powerful data processing tool for ecologists faced with vast amounts of image-based data. The ability of deep learning to accurately detect target species in videos and images unlocks the potential for rapid processing of data that usually requires hours of manual labour. […]
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Integrating Artificial Intelligence and Citizen Science can Supercharge Ecological Monitoring

  • Posted by Marina Richardson
  • On October 19, 2020
Integrating Artificial Intelligence and Citizen Science can Supercharge Ecological Monitoring By Dr. Eva McClure   People often imagine the future of technology, and science fiction has depicted many dystopian futures where artificial intelligence (AI) has taken over human civilisation. While AI surpassing human cognition is still in the realms of science fiction, AI technology and […]
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How can computer vision supercharge fish connectivity research?

  • Posted by Marina Richardson
  • On October 13, 2020
By Sebastian Lopez-Marcano  (@seabassphd) Studying animal movement is crucial. Animal movement research is conducted to monitor ecosystem health, understand ecological dynamics and address management and conservation questions. In marine environments, there are different methods to measure fish movement. From nets, tags and statistical modelling, the use of different techniques are providing us with new information […]
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Cautious optimism for the mighty Indian Sundarbans mangrove forest

  • Posted by Marina Richardson
  • On September 14, 2020
Cautious optimism for the mighty Indian Sundarbans mangrove forest By Dr Michael Sievers and Dr Mahua Roy Chowdhury Despite historic clearing and an Endangered status, there are positive signs when it comes to one of the largest mangrove ecosystems in the world. The Indian Sundarbans form part of one of the world’s largest mangrove forests. […]
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Balancing conflicting human values for seagrass, saltmarsh and mangroves

  • Posted by Chris Brown
  • On July 25, 2020
The coast sits the intersection of many human activities. Management of coastal ecosystems is challenged by the conflicting values that humans hold for the coasts, including conservation, shipping, fishing, aquaculture, recreation and many others. One objective of the Global Wetlands Project is to help find ways that management can balance these different values for coasts […]
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Long-distance sea turtle migration provides unique opportunity to combine and test exciting tracking techniques

  • Posted by Ryan Pearson
  • On July 17, 2020
By Dr Ryan Pearson In February 2016, a female loggerhead sea turtle dubbed ‘Marloo’ had a satellite transmitter attached to her shell on a beach south of Exmouth, Western Australia by the Gnaraloo wilderness foundation. Many months, and more than 4000 km’s, later she was recovered on an island near Darwin. Aub Strydom found a […]
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Automated fish identification and abundance using artificial intelligence

  • Posted by Ellen Ditria
  • On June 26, 2020
By Ellen Ditria While running video footage fresh from your underwater camera into a computer that automatically identifies species and determines abundance may seem like wishful thinking for ecologists, successes in recent research shows we’re close to having an accessible tool for researchers. The use of camera technology in aquatic sciences has increase rapidly over […]
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